A dreamy minimalist kitchen with HIMACS elements in the Nook House, London

When the architecture firm Studio 163 was tasked with transforming a small, dark kitchen into a large, naturally-lit space with a dining area, opening up into the house's garden, the job seemed simple. The real challenge of the project was turning a narrow, poorly-lit room into a large, bright kitchen-diner while making hardly any changes to the building’s façade. The original design of the façade had to be maintained, since this area of London has a marked Art Deco architectural style.

Studio 163’s proposal was to extend to the side of the house and create a window in the rear façade, making the ground floor bigger and creating a new multi-functional space. The idea being to make the most of the space, a nook was created in the window aperture that acts as a reading space, storage for the children’s games or a seat by the breakfast table. The use of a neutral palette, dominated by the colour white, and the selection of materials, such as HIMACS solid surface, play a key role in making the room feel bigger and brighter.

For the countertops on both the central island and kitchen worktops, as well as the sinks, HIMACS was chosen primarily for its excellent durability and robustness. “The property's owners had already chosen HIMACS for other projects, and their experience was so positive that they wanted to use it again in their home,” a spokesperson for Studio 163 indicated. 

What’s more, the complete absence of seams or pores in the surface of the material makes it the ideal choice for use in a space such as a kitchen, where hygiene is fundamental. Its totally homogeneous surface prevents the accumulation of dirt and possible spread of bacteria, making it easier to clean and maintain.

As well as meeting the highest hygiene standards, HIMACS provides the perfectly clean aesthetics that you want in a kitchen. The space is designed using a neutral palette of materials, inspired by the sense of relaxation the garden gives.

The project brief also included creating a subterranean wine cellar, which involved significant excavation works. However, the possibility of locating it underground made it possible to maintain the ethereal minimalist design of the room.

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